Galley: Pressure Cooker Recipes - PassageMaker

Galley: Pressure Cooker Recipes

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Using a pressure cooker cuts cooking time in half, reducing generator run time or propane consumption.

Using a pressure cooker cuts cooking time in half, reducing generator run time or propane consumption. For extended cruising, please enjoy the following Pressure Cooker Recipes.

Tomato And Sausage Soup

1 c. dried black-eyed peas
11 c. water
1 t. oil
1/2 c. dehydrated chopped onion
1/3 c. dehydrated celery
1 t. dehydrated sliced garlic
2 t. fennel seeds
1/2 t. pepper
4 bay leaves
1 t. basil
1 t. thyme
1 cube salt pork (1/4 by 1 by 1 inch)
1/2 cube chicken bouillon
3 chicken or turkey sausages, chopped
1 15-ounce can stewed tomatoes, chopped
Rinse the beans and then soak 6 hours to overnight in 4 cups water; they will double in volume. Place all ingredients except the bouillon, sausages, and tomatoes in a pressure cooker with 7 cups water. (The oil minimizes the foam produced by the beans, preventing the pressure release valve from clogging.) Follow the pressure cooker manufacturer's instructions for cooking beans. (Using my 6-liter Rapida, I lock the lid, bring to high pressure, and cook 5 minutes.) The beans should be soft but not mushy. Remove from heat and do not release the pressure. Cool until pressure lock releases. Sauté the chopped sausages. Once the pressure cooker has released, remove bay leaves and add the sausage, bouillon, and tomatoes. (Adding bouillon after the beans are cooked prevents them from getting tough.) Deglaze the sauté pan with some of the soup stock and add the pan's contents to the soup. Makes 11 cups.

Split-Pea Soup

2 c. dried split peas
9 c. water
1 t. oil
3/4 c. dehydrated chopped onion
2 bay leaves
2 t. cumin
1/2 t. cayenne
1/4 t. True Lemon (or 1 T. lemon juice)
1/4 c. dried parsley
4 T. dried garlic
2 t. black pepper
1 cube salt pork (1/4 by 1 by 1 inch)
1/2 cube vegetable or chicken bouillon dissolved in 1/2 c. hot water
Place all ingredients except bouillon in a pressure cooker. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for cooking beans. (Using my 6-liter Rapida, I lock the lid, bring to high pressure, and cook 10 minutes.) Once the pressure cooker has released, remove bay leaves. The peas should be mushy. Strain or slightly puree the soup; it should have lumps. Dissolve the bouillon and add to the soup. This soup contains about 15 percent of the salt found in a commercially canned soup. You can increase salt as desired; I compensate with cayenne or pepper. The soup will thicken as it sits, so you can adjust the thickness with water. Makes 11 cups.

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