Canadians Find Lost Franklin Expedition Ship (Video) - PassageMaker

Canadians Find Lost Franklin Expedition Ship (Video)

This discovery solves one of history's greatest mysteries, and the discovery adds relevance to arctic adventurer Sprague Theobald's upcoming TrawlerFest talk. A remotely operated underwater vehicle searching the Victoria Strait made the discovery on Sunday.
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Canadian officials have announced the discovery of a shipwreck that solves one of the greatest mysteries of all time. A search team found one of the ships belonging to the ill-fated Franklin Expedition, which was lost in 1846. Using a remotely operated underwater vehicle searching the Victoria Strait, they made the discovery on Sunday. It’s one of two ships that belonged to Sir John Franklin’s doomed Arctic expedition to find the Northwest Passage, though researchers aren’t sure yet whether it’s HMS Terror or HMS Erebus.

 Author and filmmaker Sprague Theobald says he has "very mixed feelings" about the discovery of the Franklin expedition ship. While historically it's one of the worlds biggest discoveries, romantically, it ends one of the world's biggest mysteries. Apart from that, that area is so fragile, if (the examination) is not done right, the area may suffer. This will send a lot of 'boots' up there." Theobald is speaking at TrawlerFest-Baltimore about his own 2009 transit of the Northwest Passage. Theobald will talk about his adventure/ordeal from 10:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on Friday. Friday night happens to be TrawlerFest movie night, and Theobald will be on hand to MC the documentary based on his book of the same name. Click to learn more

Author and filmmaker Sprague Theobald says he has "very mixed feelings" about the discovery of the Franklin expedition ship. While historically it's one of the worlds biggest discoveries, romantically, it ends one of the world's biggest mysteries. Apart from that, that area is so fragile, if (the examination) is not done right, the area may suffer. This will send a lot of 'boots' up there." Theobald is speaking at TrawlerFest-Baltimore about his own 2009 transit of the Northwest Passage. Theobald will talk about his adventure/ordeal from 10:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on Friday. Friday night happens to be TrawlerFest movie night, and Theobald will be on hand to MC the documentary based on his book of the same name. Click to learn more

Prime Minister Stephen Harper today issued the following statement: “I am delighted to announce that this year’s Victoria Strait Expedition has solved one of Canada’s greatest mysteries, with the discovery of one of the two ships belonging to the Franklin Expedition lost in 1846.”

“Although we do not know yet whether the discovery is Her Majesty’s Ship (HMS) Erebus or HMS Terror, we do have enough information to confirm its authenticity. This find was confirmed on Sunday, September 7, 2014, using a remotely operated underwater vehicle recently acquired by Parks Canada.

“This is truly a historic moment for Canada. Franklin’s ships are an important part of Canadian history given that his expeditions, which took place nearly 200 years ago, laid the foundations of Canada’s Arctic sovereignty.

“I would like to congratulate and pay tribute to all partners involved in this year’s momentous Victoria Strait Expedition, including Parks Canada, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS), the Arctic Research Foundation (ARF), the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), the Royal Canadian Navy and the Government of Nunavut. This discovery would not have been possible without their tireless efforts over the years, as well as their commitment, dedication and the perseverance of the many partners and explorers involved.

“Our Government has been deeply committed to finding HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, which were Canada’s only undiscovered national historical site. Since 2008, there have been six major Parks Canada-led searches for the lost Franklin Expedition ships, painstakingly covering many hundreds of square kilometres of the Arctic seabed. It is gratifying that the ship’s remains were found during the Government-supported 2014 Victoria Strait Expedition.

“Finding the first vessel will no doubt provide the momentum – or wind in our sails – necessary to locate its sister ship and find out even more about what happened to the Franklin Expedition’s crew.”

 Map of the probable routes taken by Erebus and Terror during Franklin's lost expedition.

Map of the probable routes taken by Erebus and Terror during Franklin's lost expedition.

NOW QUOTING WIKIPEDIA Franklin's lost expedition was a British voyage of Arctic exploration led by Captain Sir John Franklin that departed England in 1845. A Royal Navy officer and experienced explorer, Franklin had served on three previous Arctic expeditions, the latter two as commanding officer. His fourth and last, undertaken when he was 59, was meant to traverse the last unnavigated section of the Northwest Passage. After a few early fatalities, the two ships became icebound in Victoria Strait near King William Island in the Canadian Arctic. The entire expedition complement, including Franklin and 128 men, was lost. Pressed by Franklin's wife and others, the Admiralty launched a search for the missing expedition in 1848. Prompted in part by Franklin's fame and the Admiralty's offer of a finder's reward, many subsequent expeditions joined the hunt, which at one point in 1850 involved eleven British and two American ships. Several of these ships converged off the east coast of Beechey Island, where the first relics of the expedition were found, including the graves of three crewmen. In 1854, explorer John Rae, while surveying near the Canadian Arctic coast southeast of King William Island, acquired relicsof and stories about the Franklin party from the Inuit. A search led by Francis Leopold McClintock in 1859 discovered a note left on King William Island with details about the expedition's fate. Searches continued through much of the 19th century. In 2014, one of the ships was located west of O'Reilly Island, in the eastern portion of Queen Maud Gulf, in the waters of the Arctic archipelago. In 1981, a team of scientists led by Owen Beattie, a professor of anthropology at the University of Alberta, began a series of scientific studies of the graves, bodies, and other physical evidence left by Franklin crew members on Beechey Island and King William Island. They concluded that the crew members whose graves had been found on Beechey Island most likely died oof pneumonia and perhaps tuberculosis and that lead poisoning may have worsened their health, owing to badly soldered cans held in the ships' food stores. However, it was later suggested that the source of this lead may not have been tinned food, but the distilled water systems fitted to the expedition’s ships. Cut marks on human bones found on King William Island were seen as signs of cannibalism. The combined evidence of all studies suggested that hypothermia, starvation, lead poisoning and disease including scurvy, along with general exposure to a hostile environment whilst lacking adequate clothing and nutrition, killed everyone on the expedition in the years following its last sighting by Europeans in 1845. The Victorian media portrayed Franklin as a hero despite the expedition's failure and the reports of cannibalism. Songs were written about him, and statues of him in his home town, in London, and in Tasmania credit him with discovery of the Northwest Passage. Franklin's lost expedition has been the subject of many artistic works, including songs, verse, short stories, and novels, as well as television documentaries.

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