How Not to Treat the Local Wildlife When Cruising (BLOG/VIDEO)

Few things are more awe-inspiring than the wildlife often seen in the waters and on the shores while boating. Visiting places by boat afford humans an awesome way of viewing wildlife; up close and nonintrusive. The second of which is key.
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Its been said that the journey is just as, if not more important than the destination. Though the mantra is often reserved for analogies regarding life's progressions, it can apply to cruising as well.

Boaters are a particularly lucky bunch as the places they visit are often just as magical as what they pass on the voyage to get there; take Scott and Mary Flanders' voyage through Iceland for example (Whales & Ice, PassageMaker, March 2014). As an aside, Scott and Mary will be speaking at this week's TrawlerFest-Baltimore about preparing and completing a voyage such as theirs. You can register for their seminar by clicking here.

Few things are more awe-inspiring than the wildlife often seen in the waters and on the shores while boating. Visiting places by boat afford humans an awesome way of viewing wildlife; up-close and nonintrusive. The second of which is key.

In the video below a pair of boaters in Brazil harass a yellow anaconda with an oar before grabbing it by the tail and dragging it into a river. Naturally the snake, which appears to have just finished a thanksgiving dinner, wiggles free and tries to swim away before being chased down a second time.

According to reports in the South American country, the couple appeared to be "very simple and layman" and said they did not know their action was a crime as is the case in many countries.

According to Britain’s Daily Mail, the duo is facing a fine of about $1,500 each and as much as 18 months in jail.

The same laws can be the case with marine animals. Boaters that encounter whales and other mammals should act in accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act, which calls for cruisers to reduce speed and remember not to intentionally approach within 100 yards of the animals. A violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act or the Endangered Species Act may result in fines or civil penalties of up to $10,000 or criminal penalties of up to $20,000 plus imprisonment and/or seizure of vessel and other personal property.

Do you best to avoid an inconvenience for both you and the animals you cross; take only photos, leaving only a wake behind.

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